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Record: oai:ARNO:332402

AuthorsJ. van der Schalk, B. Beersma, G.A. van Kleef, C.K.W. de Dreu
TitleThe more (complex), the better? The influence of epistemic motivation on integrative bargaining in complex negotiation
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume40
Year2010
Issue2
Pages355-365
ISSN00462772
FacultyFaculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences
Institute/dept.FMG: Psychology Research Institute
AbstractNegotiating about a larger number of issues is often argued to enhance the potential for integrative bargaining. However, the enhanced complexity may also make negotiators more susceptible to bias, making it less likely for them to reach win–win agreements. We argue that epistemic motivation, the motivation to hold accurate perceptions of the world, provides a key to solve this paradox. In a negotiation experiment we manipulated complexity by having participants negotiate about 6 or 18 issues and we manipulated epistemic motivation by making participants process-accountable or not. Under low
complexity, there was no effect of epistemic motivation on created value. Under high complexity, however, negotiators with high epistemic motivation created more value than negotiators with low epistemic motivation. Thus, negotiating about larger numbers of issues was only beneficial for negotiators if they were motivated to think deeply and thoroughly.
NoteThis is the pre-peer-reviewed version of the following article:
Van der Schalk, J., Beersma, B., Van Kleef, G.A., & De Dreu, C.K.W. (2010). The more (complex), the better? The influence of epistemic motivation on integrative bargaining in complex negotiation. European Journal of Social Psychology, 40, 355-365.
which has been published in final form at DOI: 10.1002/ejsp.633
Document typeArticle
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