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Query: faculty: "FMG" and publication year: "2011"

AuthorsK.R. Ridderinkhof, B.U. Forstmann, S.A. Wylie, B. Burle, W.P.M. van den Wildenberg
TitleNeurocognitive mechanisms of action control: resisting the call of the sirens
JournalWiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Cognitive Science
Volume2
Year2011
Issue2
Pages174-192
ISSN19395078
FacultyFaculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences
Institute/dept.FMG: Psychology Research Institute
AbstractAn essential facet of adaptive and versatile behavior is the ability to prioritize actions in response to dynamically changing circumstances. The field of potential actions afforded by a situation is shaped by many factors, such as environmental demands, past experiences, and prepotent tendencies. Selection among action affordances can be driven by deliberate, intentional processes as a product of goal-directed behavior and by extraneous stimulus–action associations as established inherently or through learning. We first review the neurocognitive mechanisms putatively linked to these intention-driven and association-driven routes of action selection. Next, we review the neurocognitive mechanisms engaged to inhibit action affordances that are no longer relevant or that interfere with goal-directed action selection. Optimal action control is viewed as a dynamic interplay between selection and suppression mechanisms, which is achieved by an elaborate circuitry of interconnected cortical regions (most prominently the pre-supplementary motor area and the right inferior frontal cortex) and basal ganglia structures (most prominently the dorsal striatum and the subthalamic nucleus).
Document typeArticle
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